Guide to Recyclables — Brush Waste

leavesThe Ewing Township Public Works Department accepts yard waste including leaves [loose or bagged in biodegradable bags] as well as tree parts and other vegetative debris at their Brush drop off Convenience site which is open year round.

Location: Jack Stephan Way, Ewing, NJ 08638  (off of Parkway Avenue, at the old Naval Jet Propulsion Center)
Phone: 609-882-3382
Hours:  M-F 7am-4pm | Sat 7am-3:30pm

Proof of Ewing residency, which must be a Valid NJ Driver License, a current tax bill or a utility bill is required.

Source: http://ewingnj.org/public-works/brush-bulk-waste/


Fall Leaf Collection

baggedleavesThe Township Public Works Department also provides leaf pick up in all sections of Ewing in two rounds. Upon completion of the first round, they immediately begin a second round. Leaves can be loose or bagged.  However, it is REQUIRED that all leaves that are bagged should be in biodegradable or recyclable bags.

Restrictions
  • Do NOT put loose leaves out on the street prior to the start date of the pickup schedule.  [You may take your bagged leaves to the Jack Stephen Way Convenience Site at any time.]
  • Do NOT mix your leaves and brush together.
  • An anticipated leaf pickup collection schedule is published each fall.  Check the twp. website or local newspapers for it.

 Spring Yard Debris Collection

Curbside yard debris collection is also conducted by the Public Works staff for two months each spring.  Items include the following:

  • Tree Parts including wood, branches to 8ft long. tied bundles (no wire), twigs etc.
  • Bagged leaves or twigs in biodegradable bags.

Again, leaves and brush must not be mixed.


Leaf Cycling

The EGT encourages  you to consider a far better way to handle your autumn leaf drop – leaf cycle.  This process recharges your yards with your own organic debris instead of giving it away by bagging or piling leaves out at the curb.  There are a number of really simple environmentally friendly ways to handle your leaf drop that don’t starve your yard and also decrease your impact on municipal services to save $$$.

So what to do with those leaves?

  1. The first method involves very little raking and effort on your part. Run your lawn mower over the leaves where they lie and chop them up into small pieces.  The chopped leaves can stay on your lawn and decompose there. This is an excellent way to help build up the soil. This works best with a mulching mower which is meant to chop materials into fairly small pieces. Do this as needed until the end of the season and the leaves will break down over the winter providing your soil with valuable nutrients.
  2. Another method not quite so effortless is raking those chopped up leaves and mulching your garden beds with them. This will protect your plants from the vagaries of the winter weather and also provide your beds with valuable nutrients when the leaves break down.
  3. If you run out of time (or energy) you can forgo chopping with the mower and leave the leaves in the beds where they fall and pile on more.  This will accomplish two necessary tasks.   It will (a) remove your leaves from any hard surfaces on your property where they can become slick and messy, and (b) remove those leaves from your lawn where they can smother the turf grass.  This also will provide for a neater end of the year appearance.
  4. Add your leaves to your compost pile.  The leaves will decompose more quickly if you chop them with your lawn mower as recommended above. Then gather them up (it’s amazing how a large pile of leaves reduces in size) and add them to the pile. If your pile is composed only of chopped leaves, you can make leaf mold for use at a later time. If you have green debris from your garden you can mix the two in layers and let it sit over the winter. Turn the pile when the weather permits and you will eventually have the Black Gold of the garden world – compost.

We encourage you to avail yourselves of the multifold benefits of leaf hoarding.  Your yard will thank you for it.

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